2015年4月20日星期一

Lord Janner's alleged victim breaks silence to say decision not to prosecute 'beggars belief'

  • Hamish Baillie says Lord Janner abused him during hide-and-seek in 1983
  • Father-of-three, 47, was a 15-year-old resident of a children’s home at time
  • He says failure to prosecute the peer for a fourth time is ‘complete travesty’
  • CPS boss Alison Saunders said Janner was unfit to plead due to dementia

Father Hamish Baillie (pictured) claims Lord Janner abused him during a game of hide-and-seek in 1983

Father Hamish Baillie (pictured) claims Lord Janner abused him during a game of hide-and-seek in 1983

A father allegedly abused by Lord Janner has called for the top legal official who decided against prosecuting him to step down.

Alison Saunders, Director of Public Prosecutions, concluded dementia made the 86-year-old unfit to plead.

Last night, one of the nine victims who had been lined up to give evidence against the former Leicester West MP waived his right to anonymity to say the decision ‘beggars belief’ – and claimed it points to an establishment cover-up.

Hamish Baillie, 47, said he was unable to trust adults after being molested by Lord Janner during a game of hide-and-seek in a park, when he was a 15-year-old resident of a children’s home.

But he added that the failure to prosecute the peer for a fourth time – three inquiries were curtailed by police or the Crown Prosecution Service – was a ‘complete travesty’.

The father-of-three said he turned to drugs as a result of the abuse, which left him ‘questioning myself and everyone around me’.

He believes Lord Janner was ‘steered’ in his direction by the care home’s manager, Frank Beck – a friend who would later be convicted of a string of child sex offences.

He added: ‘I don’t think anybody other than the victims and the police involved in the Operation Enamel inquiry understand how perverted a man Lord Janner is. 

'He has blighted my life … How can they [the CPS] publicise the fact that there was enough evidence to charge, yet then say it is not in the public interest to pursue it?’

Mr Baillie, of Hinckley, Leicestershire, added: ‘No disrespect to the public, but what about the interest of the victims?

‘As far as I’m concerned, her [Mrs Saunders’s] actions are barely any less perverse than the abuse inflicted upon me as a teenager. She should initiate an inquiry into her own conduct and then step down because Alison Saunders certainly hasn’t been doing her job properly.’

Lord Janner

Alison Saunders said her job as head of the Crown Prosecution Service was to make the correct legal decisions in difficult cases, not the most popular ones

Mr Baillie said the decision not to prosecute Lord Janner (left),  who he claims abused him when he was aged 15,  for the fourth time was a 'complete travesty'. Alison Saunders (right) said her job as head of the Crown Prosecution Service was to make the correct legal decisions in difficult cases, not the most popular ones

He said the police involved in the inquiry were ‘blameless’ but added that ‘when one considers this is the fourth time Janner has been investigated, I honestly think there could be a cover-up at play’.

Operation Enamel was set up two years ago and 25 victims accused the Labour peer. Most lived in Leicestershire children’s homes between 1969 and 1988.

The CPS last week said the ‘core allegation’ was that Lord Janner befriended Beck to access children ‘to allow him to perpetrate serious sexual offences’ on them.

The politician was first implicated during the 1991 trial of Beck, who ran The Beeches children’s home in Leicester. 

A victim told the court Janner regularly abused him. Beck was convicted of child abuse and rape charges. He died in jail in 1994.

Following Beck’s conviction, Lord Janner, then an MP, stood up in the House of Commons to vehemently deny any abuse, and the CPS decided not to take further action. 

But Mr Baillie, who spent ten months at The Beeches – where he was twice groped by Beck – said he firmly believes the men were acting together to abuse children.

He was placed in care aged 15 for ‘rebellious behaviour’ and said he met Lord Janner in 1983 while playing arcade games at Leicester Forest East service station.

The peer called him by name, he said, even though ‘I didn’t know him’ and gave him some coins.

Mr Baillie said over the next seven months Lord Janner came to the service station seven times, sometimes discussing a hotel where they could go for ‘steak and whisky’.

It was amid a game of hide-and-seek in Bradgate Park, Leicestershire, organised by Beck later that year, that he claims he was abused by the peer.

‘I was just moving behind a gorse bush to hide when I saw Greville Janner walking towards me,’ he said. 

‘He sat down beside me … Then he abused me. It was indecent touching but he wanted it to go further … It lasted no more than 30 minutes, but it felt like an eternity.’

Mr Baillie believes Beck ‘tipped Janner off about where to find me’.

He did not report the abuse to police and only realised who Lord Janner was when he saw the MP’s picture in a newspaper five years later.

He added: ‘The fact that Greville Janner has been able to stand up in Parliament and deny abusing children, then carry on with his gilded life is beyond comprehension.’ 

Legal chief facing growing calls to quit: Backlash against top prosecutor grows as she is accused of ignoring victims and claims of a establishment cover-up 

The furious backlash against the UK’s top prosecutor intensified last night over her decision to spare Lord Janner from the dock.

The position of Director of Public Prosecutions Alison Saunders looked increasingly fragile as she faced growing calls to stand down.

Campaigners, police chiefs and MPs accused her of ignoring the rights of victims and failing to clear the stench of an Establishment cover-up that lingers over the case.

And even her one of her predecessors said the horrific allegations should have been resolved in the ‘full public glare of a courtroom’ rather than her London office.

Mrs Saunders fought back saying it is her job as the head of the Crown Prosecution Service to make ‘very difficult decisions’ which are not necessarily popular.

Campaigners, police chiefs and MPs have accused Alison Saunders, the director of the CPS (above), of ignoring the rights of victims and failing to clear the stench of an Establishment cover-up that lingers overhead

Campaigners, police chiefs and MPs have accused Alison Saunders, the director of the CPS (above), of ignoring the rights of victims and failing to clear the stench of an Establishment cover-up that lingers overhead

Sir Loader appalled at decision to not prosecute Janner (related)

But the row showed no sign of abating as further details of the claims levelled against the 86-year-old Labour life Peer were made public.

The decision not to charge Lord Janner last week despite evidence of 22 offences against nine victims was justified because Mrs Saunders said experts agreed that the former Leicester West MP was in such poor health due to advanced Alzheimer’s Disease.

But she also ruled that he should have been charged three times before in 1991, 2002 and 2007 but was left off the hook.

The top QC blamed police and prosecutors and launched in independent review, but her comments stoked fears that Lord Janner is the beneficiary of a wholesale cover-up.

Yesterday, calls were growing for a judicial review of her decision, something which Leicestershire Police has said it is already considering.

Simon Danczuk, the Labour MP who exposed Cyril Smith, said the weight of criticism against Mrs Saunders suggested something has ‘clearly gone very badly wrong’.

He said: ‘Mrs Saunders is now seen as a roadblock to justice and it’s hard to see how her position remains tenable.’

Mrs Saunders is now seen as a roadblock to justice and it’s hard to see how her position remains tenable 

Labour MP Simon Danczuk

Criticism of Mrs Saunders began with comments from the Home Secretary, who has already been lobbied by senior police chiefs, when she said is ‘very concerned’.

Theresa May said: ‘I have been very clear in everything I have said so far about the child sex abuse issue – I expect to see justice done.’

She was joined by former Director of Public Prosecutions Lord Macdonald who said a ‘trial of the facts’ should have been considered.

This would have enabled a jury to decide the facts without apportioning guilt and without a sentence being passed – offering a chance for victims to be heard.

Lord Macdonald said: ‘It might have been wiser for the CPS to say ‘we’re going to have this matter resolved in the full public glare of a courtroom rather than simply by the DPP.’

Further questions also emerged about the true state of Lord Janner’s health as it was revealed he wrote to the House of Lords just a fortnight ago to extend his role.

The politician, who has claimed tens of thousands of pounds in expenses in recent years, took a formal leave of absence last October.

When asked if he would consider retiring when the election was called, he responded in a personally signed letter received on April 9 asking to continue in office.

Experts said victims may now be denied the opportunity to sue Lord Janner because none of the claims have been proven.

Richard Kovalevsky QC said: ‘A finding that the acts took place may have consequences for the defendant, particularly one who has the benefit of an honour from the Queen.’

Mrs Saunders has also come under fire over other high-profile cases, including the first disastrous attempt for a conviction for female genital mutilation and the pursuit of journalists. 



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